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108 citations found for Takata,

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Acta Cryst. (2005). A61, c325-c326
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Acta Cryst. (2005). A61, c464-c465
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Acta Cryst. (2004). A60, s179
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Acta Cryst. (1996). A52, C113
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Acta Cryst. (2014). A70, C1299
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A century ago, crystallogtaphy ushered in the era of modern science & technology in Japan. The beginning of modern crystallography in Japan dates back to 1913. Torahiko Terada (Tokyo Imperial University) demonstrated X-ray diffraction[1] and Shoji Nishikawa (Tokyo Imperial University) reported on X-ray patterns of fibrous, lamellar and granular substances[2]. In 1936, Ukichiro Nakaya (Hokkaido University) successfully classified natural snow crystals and made the first artificial snow crystals. In the last half-century, developments in crystallography helped form thriving manufacturing sectors such as the semiconductor industry, the iron and steel industries, the pharmaceutical industry, the electronics industry, the textile industry, and the polymer industry, as well as a wide array of academic research.



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Rod-shaped scattering, referred to as crystal truncation rod (CTR) scattering in X-ray diffraction, can also be observed in optical diffraction patterns obtained from the surface profile image of high-resolution electron micrographs. The characteristics of the CTR scattering are shown to be in agreement with those observed by X-ray scattering. With this technique, information about the lattice relaxation of the image of surfaces or interface boundaries observed in the electron microscope (EM) can be easily obtained and the lattice spacing of a GaAs crystal is shown to be shrunk at the interface boundary between the (001) surface and the amorphous oxide layer. This is precisely opposite to the effect observed for an Si (001) wafer surface. Several effects of surface modulation on CTR scattering are demonstrated using an optical diffractometer and masks of the f.c.c. lattice.


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A two-dimensional photon-counting detector based on a micro-pixel gas chamber has demonstrated a dynamic range of >105 and a counting rate of up to 5 MHz.


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Acta Cryst. (2005). A61, c253-c254
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The performance of a fast pixel array detector with a grid mask resolution enhancer has been demonstrated for X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy experiments.

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Acta Cryst. (1996). A52, C349
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Acta Cryst. (2014). A70, C1304
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"We can find many seeds of crystallography in Japanese culture. Most of the family crests have symmetry elements such as rotation axes and mirror symmetry elements. Sekka-zue, a picture book of 86 kinds of crystals of snow, was made by Toshitura Doi, who is a feudal lord in Edo-period and he observed snow using a microscope in nineteenth century. In recent years, people enjoy to make crystal structures, polyhedrons, carbon nanotube, quasicrystal etc. by origami, the art of folding paper [1]. In the field of science, the Japanese crystallography has contributed to explore culture and art. An excellent example is unveiling the original color of Japanese painting "Red and White Plum Blossoms" by Korin Ogata [2]. Prof. Izumi Nakai (Tokyo University of Science) developed an X-ray fluorescence analyzer and an X-ray powder diffractometer designated to the investigation of cultural and art works and had succeeded in reproducing the silver-colored waves through computer graphics after X-ray analyses of crystals on the painting. The scientific approach by Prof. Nakai et al. unveiled the mystery of cultural heritage of ancient near east, ancient Egypt etc. and is being to contribute to insight into the history of human culture. [1] An event to enjoy making crystals by origami is under contemplation. [2] The symposium ""Crystallography which revives heritages"" was held on February 16, 2014 at Atami in Japan."


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Lattice strain was determined by neutron transmission and diffraction during tensile testing. The position dependence of the lattice strain was clearly observed by Bragg-edge transmission.

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